6 papers by Barbara McClintock 1948-1952 her Nobel Prize work

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Title 6 papers by Barbara McClintock 1948-1952 her Nobel Prize work
Author McClintock, Barbara
Binding PAMPHLET
Publisher Carnegie Institute Year Book, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1948-1952
Condition Very Good
Description A rare group of Barbara McClintock's most important papers. Included are: Mutiable Loci in Maize offprint from Carnegie Institution of Washington Year Book No. 47, for the year 1947-1948, pages 155 to 169. Issues December 10, 1948; Mutable Loci in Maize offprint from Carnegie Institution of Washington Year Book No. 48, for the year 1948-1949, pages 142 to 154. Issued December 9, 1949; Mutable Loci in Maize offprint from Carnegie Institution of Washington Year Book No. 49, for the year 1949-1950, pages 157-167. Issued December 15, 1950; The Origin and Behavior of Mutable Loci in Maize offprint from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 36, No. 6, pp. 311-355, June 1950; Mutable Loci in Maize offprint from Carnegie Institution of Washington Year Book No. 50, for the year 1950-1951, pages 174 to 181. Issued December 14, 1951; Mutable Loci in Maize offprint from Carnegie Institution of Washington Year Book No. 51, for the year 1951-1952, pages 212 to 219. Issued December 12, 1952. 3 have J.T, Baldwin's stamp of ownership, 2 Norman H. Giles stamp of ownership, and one has Franz Schrader's ownership signature. All are in very good condition, with little rusted staples. "Between 1948 and 1950, she developed a theory by which these mobile elements regulated the genes by inhibiting or modulating their action. She referred to Dissociator and Activator as "controlling units"?later, as "controlling elements"?to distinguish them from genes. She hypothesized that gene regulation could explain how complex multicellular organisms made of cells with identical genomes have cells of different function.[47] McClintock's discovery challenged the concept of the genome as a static set of instructions passed between generations.[2] In 1950, she reported her work on Ac/Ds and her ideas about gene regulation in a paper entitled "The origin and behavior of mutable loci in maize" published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In summer 1951, when she reported her work on the origin and behavior of mutable loci in maize at the annual symposium at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, presenting a paper of the same name. The paper delved into the instability caused by Dc and As or just As in four genes, along with the tendency of those genes to unpredictably revert to the wild phenotype. She also identified "families" of transposons, which did not interact with one another.[2][48][44] Her work on controlling elements and gene regulation was conceptually difficult and was not immediately understood or accepted by her contemporaries; she described the reception of her research as "puzzlement, even hostility".[49][44] Nevertheless, McClintock continued to develop her ideas on controlling elements. She published a paper in Genetics in 1953, where she presented all her statistical data, and undertook lecture tours to universities throughout the 1950s to speak about her work.[50] She continued to investigate the problem and identified a new element that she called Suppressor-mutator (Spm), which, although similar to Ac/Ds, acts in a more complex manner. Like Ac/Ds, some versions could transpose on their own and some could not; unlike Ac/Ds, when present, it fully suppressed the expression of mutant genes when they normally would not be entirely suppressed.[51] Based on the reactions of other scientists to her work, McClintock felt she risked alienating the scientific mainstream, and from 1953 stopped publishing accounts of her research on controlling elements." "The importance of McClintock's contributions was revealed in the 1960s, when the work of French geneticists Francois Jacob and Jacques Monod described the genetic regulation of the lac operon, a concept she had demonstrated with Ac/Ds in 1951." Wikipedia*

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